All your circles are belong to us – byteengine

Why did you pick this picture?
I chose this because it symbolizes my return to drawing, after a 20+ year hiatus.

Where did you get the idea from?
I’ve always drawn intricately and at a small scale. It wasn’t until I visited a museum that I discovered that other artists work at a much larger scale. When I started drawing again, one of the first exercises I did was to try to draw the smallest circles that I could possibly draw. I even posted some of the initial concepts to Instagram.

What does this mean to you?
My day job is a VP of Product, developing software for a digital marketing company. Abstracts – like this piece – are very difficult for me because as a former coder and slightly OCD, I want everything to make sense; I want to be able to figure it out like a puzzle. But abstracts aren’t like that; there is nothing to figure out; they’re open to interpretation. So I wanted to draw something that encompassed the initial “smallest” idea, while challenging myself to be abstract in executing it.
There are approximately 71,000 circles in this drawing. I sometimes start with a pencil sketch, but in this case, the drawing is sort of an emotional diary. Smaller circles == dark areas == folds.

The more relaxed and at ease I am, the smaller I can draw the circles. So bigger circles (kind of) represent areas of anxiety, tension, or stress. And I just let it flow and see where it goes. It’s a reflection of my emotions over the timeline of the drawing.

What can you tell us about yourself?
When I was young, I used to draw all the time. Constantly. My parents couldn’t send me to my room as a punishment because I loved being in there; I’d just spend hours drawing. I would doodle in all of my school notebooks, and would get reprimanded constantly for doodling instead of paying attention in class. As I got older, I transitioned into writing music, and then I got my first computer – a Commodore VIC20, followed by a Macintosh IIcx – and that was that; everything I did from that point on was on the computer, and I stopped drawing with pens, pencils, and paper entirely. 

But I never really stopped doodling, and almost all of my work notebooks are filled with doodles in between the words. I got divorced about five years ago and as part of the healing process, I started drawing again. But between being a dad to two amazing sons, having a day job, and trying to have a social life, drawing was a luxury that I could never really find time to fit into my schedule.

My main stress release was riding my motorcycle, but I was recently involved in a motorcycle accident that completely totalled the bike. I was amazingly lucky enough to walk away with only a concussion (thanks to all of my safety gear), but I was left without my main source of stress relief and I needed to replace it. So I came back to drawing. I find it incredibly medatiative, and I lose large chucks of time to drawing and thinking and contemplating. It’s incredibly powerful.

What more can you tell us about your art?
I dig using and playing with geometrics shapes, especially representing depth. I’ve been drawing those in (just) black ink, typically freehand. I’m trying to slow down, plan ahead, do pencil sketches first, and improve the quality, though some people like the rough quality, so I’m torn. I’m also starting to experiment with color, as you can see on my Instagram page.

To see more of byteengine’s art please follow the link below to see their instgram picture 

Done. "All your circles are belong to us." 5"x7". Please ZOOM IN. There are approximately 71,000 circles in this #drawing. I sometimes start with a pencil sketch, but in this case, the drawing is sort of an emotional diary. Smaller circles == dark areas == folds. The more relaxed and at ease I am, the smaller I can draw the circles. So bigger circles (kind of) represent areas of anxiety, tension, or stress. And I just let it flow and see where it goes. It's a reflection of my #emotions over the timeline of the drawing. And to those who inquired about obtaining this piece, I truly appreciate the interest, but it's spoken for; my youngest son has asked if he can hang it up in his room. So my two latest pieces belong to my two biggest fans. ❤️ Guess I'll just have to make MORE ART! #iblackwork #blackwork #doodle #doodles #modernart #art #artwork #sketch #draw #rapidograph #blackandwhite #pen #ink #design #illustration #abstract #abstractart #geometry #geometric #illustration #contemporaryart #circle #circles #dots #dot #artcollective2016 #rotring #DrawYourVision

A post shared by Matthew Schultz (@byteengine) on

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